‘Lockdowns Had Little To No Public Health Effects’ Against COVID: Johns Hopkins University

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El American Newsroom

A Johns Hopkins Meta-analysis highlights that lockdowns had a huge impact on the economy and mental health.

Lockdowns only reduced COVID-19 deaths by 0.2% during the first wave of coronaviruses in Europe and the United States, according to a meta-analysis of several studies from Johns Hopkins University.

“An analysis of each of these three groups support the conclusion that lockdowns have had little to no effect on COVID-19 mortality,” he said.

They detailed that limiting outings and meetings may have influenced the increased mortality from the disease. “Limitations may isolate an infected person at home with his or her family, where he or she risks infecting family members with a higher viral load, leading to more severe disease,” they noted.

Effects of lockdowns according to Johns Hopkins

The study also added that “lockdowns have limited people’s access to safe (outdoor) places such as beaches, parks, and zoos, or included outdoor mask mandates or strict outdoor gathering restrictions, pushing people to meet at less safe (indoor) places.”

In addition, it revealed that the lockdowns had other consequences that affected citizens directly. For example, an increase in unemployment, reduced schooling, increased incidents of domestic violence and increased drug overdoses.

“While this meta-analysis concludes that lockdowns have had little to no public health effects, they have imposed enormous economic and social costs where they have been adopted,” the researchers wrote.